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What if we could detect ARDS hours before the onset?

We need your help to revolutionize the power of proactive care using predictive technology.

The problem - ARDS management

  • 1. Early ARDS detection is hard
    ARDS often develops in Emergency Departments (ED)[10] or general hospital wards[11], well ahead of ICU admission. Complex aetiology means ARDS can be unrecognisable - even to the most experienced eyes, until clinical deterioration becomes clear. [12]
  • 2. Fragmented information makes ARDS detection & management even harder
    Critical care teams are faced with information-dense monitoring, often from disparate sources - some returning results hours after the fact. It's hard to build a cohesive clinical picture that identifies patients at risk of serious deterioration or death [14,15] - forcing reactive management decisions and delayed intervention.
  • 3. Time is of the essence
    Delayed critical care intervention is independently associated with a 47% higher mortality rate in ARDS patients than when acute deterioration is recognised and responded to in a timely fashion. [13]
  • 4. Timely detection & early intervention save lives.
    Early intervention has been shown to decrease likelihood of ARDS onset in at-risk patients [20,24]. Timely detection of deterioration and early intervention not only improves survival [21,22,25,26] but reduces severity of serious complications [23,25,26] responsible for long-term disabilities currently faced by >60% of ARDS survivors [6-9].
  • 5. Automated early warning systems can identify at-risk patients.
    Software-based technology can use existing hospital electronic medical records (EMR) to identify patients at risk of serious deterioration or death [16-19].
  • References & Substantiations
    [10] Increasing critical care admissions from U.S. emergency departments, 2001–2009. Crit Care Med 2013;41:1197–204. doi:10.1097/CCM.0b013e31827c086f [11] The epidemiology of acute organ system dysfunction from severe sepsis outside of the intensive care unit. J Hosp Med 2013;8:243–7. doi:10.1002/jhm.2012 [12] Duration of life-threatening antecedents prior to intensive care admission. Intensive Care Med 2002;28:1629–34. doi:10.1007/s00134-002-1496-y [13] Delayed medical emergency team calls and associated outcomes. Crit Care Med 2014;42:26–30. doi:10.1097/CCM.0b013e31829e53b9 [14] Introduction of the medical emergency team (MET) system: a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2005;365:2091–7. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)66733-5 [15] Systematic review and evaluation of physiological track and trigger warning systems for identifying at-risk patients on the ward. Intensive Care Med 2007;33:667–79. doi:10.1007/s00134-007-0532-3 [16] Systematic review and evaluation of physiological track and trigger warning systems for identifying at-risk patients on the ward. Intensive Care Med 2007;33:667–79. doi:10.1007/s00134-007-0532-3 [17] Do either early warning systems or emergency response teams improve hospital patient survival? A systematic review. Resuscitation 2013;84:1652–67. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.08.006 [18] Using electronic health record data to develop and validate a prediction model for adverse outcomes in the wards*. Crit Care Med 2014;42:841–8. doi:10.1097/CCM.0000000000000038 [19] Multicenter development and validation of a risk stratification tool for ward patients. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2014;190:649–55. doi:10.1164/rccm.201406-1022OC [20] Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: converting science to reality. Chest 2006;129:217–18. doi:10.1378/chest.129.2.217 [21] Mechanical ventilation as a mediator of multisystem organ failure in acute respiratory distress syndrome. JAMA 2000;284:43–4. doi:10.1001/jama.284.1.43 [22] Timing of low tidal volume ventilation and intensive care unit mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective cohort study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2015;191:177–85. doi:10.1164/rccm.201409-1598OC [23] Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. N Engl J Med 2000;342:1301–8. doi:10.1056/NEJM200005043421801 [24] Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: converting science to reality. Chest 2006;129:217–18. doi:10.1378/chest.129.2.217 [25] Mechanical ventilation as a mediator of multisystem organ failure in acute respiratory distress syndrome. JAMA 2000;284:43–4. doi:10.1001/jama.284.1.43 [26] Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. N Engl J Med 2000;342:1301–8.doi:10.1056/NEJM200005043421801
Health data

Fragmented health data

Information overload

Information overload

75% delayed intervention

75% delayed intervention

35% long-term disability

35% Long-term disability (for survivors)

 We want to empower our frontline heroes  with the right information, at the right time, for the right patients to benefit from proactive clinical care.

AboutIASO

How can we help?

Iaso Automated Medical Systems is a medical device company in New Zealand dedicated to helping intensivists achieve the best possible outcomes for critically-ill patients. Our team is on a mission to revolutionise detection and management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome through powerful Machine Learning technology poised to help critical care teams make swift, evidence based decisions.

A successful solution will enable:

  • Early warning and detection of ARDS onset

  • Early intervention to reduce disease progression

  • More efficient use of scarce and costly resources

 Providing the right information at the right time. 

machine learning solution

Calling all doctors, nurses, researchers, clinical advisors, and thought leaders: 
We need your expertise to help us design a groundbreaking platform for ARDS management.

Healthcare heroes

ARDS Onset Parameters

We want to help you deliver the best possible outcomes for critically-ill patients. We need to know what clinical information is most valuable to you when detecting & managing ARDS.

Critical Care Technology

To help us design the best platform possible, please click below to tell us about how you currently use technology in your workplace.

*Your privacy matters to us, click here to see what we happens with your survey data.

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Prefer to chat? So do we.

We’d love to hear your experience and what makes it harder to deliver the best possible outcomes for ARDS patients. Get in touch with us for an informal chat by clicking on the below, and the team will contact you as soon as possible. 

Meet the team

Meet our incredible team of Medical Device industry professionals leveraging decades of expertise across healthcare commercialization, regulatory affairs, machine learning and cloud architecture ventures to bring world class solutions to the ICU.

 

Between our team we share... 

3

Multi-billion medical device M&A deals

2

Decades in machine learning expertise

1

Highly commended global finance expert

30+ years in SaMD

 

40+ years risk management

Tyler Harmon CEO

Tyler Harmon

CEO and Co-Founder

Theo Nicholson CTO

Theo Nicholson III, Ph.D

 CTO and Co-Founder

LaDahvia Fowler CQO

LaDahvia Flournoy Fowler, MSc

 CQO/CRO and Co-Founder

Andrew Seay CFO

Andrew Seay

 CFO/COO and Co-Founder

Jillian Atkinson UX

Jillian Atkinson

Head of UI/UX Design

Samantha MacNamara COO

Samantha MacNamara

Head of Clinical Operations

Team

Interested in the future of ARDS detection & management and our journey?
J
oin our mailing list.

Or flick us a message at
hello@iasoams.com

*For data privacy and content terms and conditions, click here.
 

Thanks! Look out for updates.

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